The Hair on Ripping: They Are From Here / A Difficult Topic

Posted on Updated on

They Are From Here
They Are From Here

QUOTES From “AMERICA’S
WOMEN … ” BY GAIL COLLINS
” AMERICA’S WOMEN / WOMEN AND ABOLITION
(184 – 185)”

(1) from p. 184
“The overwhelming impression of the lives of most plantation wives is of isolation … Considering how fragile women were presumed to be, planters left them alone on remote farms among hundreds of slaves with stunning impunity.”

” WOMEN AND ABOLITION (187)”
(2) from p. 187
“Like many of her fellow Southerners, she disliked the institution yet wanted the service. But on the subject of sex, her intense feeling was uncomplicated. The most famous remark in her diaries was that every Southern lady ‘ tells you who is the father of all the mulatto children in everybody’s household, but those in her own she seems to think drop from the clouds, or pretends so to think. ‘ ”

The Hair on Ripping: They Are From Here / A Difficult Topic
by Goura Fotadar

I’ve been in academic-centered courses, where even in the Modern Day (as in now); people shirk the responsibility of speaking their views on this difficult topic. No matter how many representations I have read or Scene (not a typo.) of this / on this topic; I feel as though I will never know …
Personally, I think these quotes from this text, representing some, or a few of women’s perspectives; regarding this difficult topic, and also from the point of privilege, are those worthy of
pondering:
For example, in the first quote, we hear about the difficulty of running a plantation for “wives” alone. But there is no seeming conscious acknowledgment of the bizarre existence of unemployed–employment and /or more severely put : slavery. The only acknowledgment that is demonstrated is something like a denial, if not in fact an actual denial; and is done so perhaps through the word “impunity,” at the end of the first quote. From this word’s use, it almost seems that women are used to escape at least the internal ramifications of, by men slave-owner-ship.  But and because of this perhaps again, women are still involved in this topic.
The first quote describes the apparent concept of running & the experience of doing so, a plantation alone; an experience as for women /wives, and that this is one of gender inequality, or so it can be surmised. But the further-ing of inequality; i.e., slavery is
carried
out
by this
other
inequality : marriage to a plantation man and /or slave-owner; can mean in this case either the consent-to or forced into consent-to not just supporting, but also again furthering slavery; with the simultaneous, (and perhaps? potential), experience of aloneness in running a plantation with slaves; and in either (again), a forced consenting-to or an independent consenting of being, what might be called, the unjust employer and /or unjust boss of slaves.
For even a slaveowner and /or plantation “staff”
, who treats slaves
“better”
is still at least
something like an unjust employer and /or unjust boss:
hence? the
term “slave”.
From the second quote, we can hear again about the double-standards as they apply in this case to a woman of privilege; and
despite even the man / woman gender inequality. Here, there seems to be the enthusiasm of informing about the progeny of men / slave owners /plantation “staff,” outside of their marriages; and then the denial of this,
being actual
by the
woman
inside
such a
marriage; and despite her own enthusiasm, for this sort of information passing.
And now of course we are hit with many things; among them:
that familiar
cultural
heritage,
that many children
were born into this system of inequality
and injustice; and by fathers who may
have
been
their
then
unjust employers;
at least;
and
again, among,
other titles.
The last line in the second quote, though
describing a convenient explanation; though certainly supernatural in analysis; whether meant this way or not; is that which describes these children;
as being from
“the clouds;”
& perhaps
we can
think of birds
& other air
existences;
but of course
in “the clouds,” is a
suggested, but who knows,
if an accurate concept of
heaven;
for those that
think with a supernatural bent; and then
the entire thing
becomes ah,
even more
difficult; because it is implied even if only initially
meant as a method of escaping, the: what-is
actually taking place; and in this case from a woman’s perspective, also:
that children at least
some
if not
all
who are
born into
this system
of injustice
and inequality
are but from
Heaven. How
controversial?

Reference
“AMERICA’S WOMEN
400 YEARS OF
DOLLS, DRUDGES, HELPMATES, AND HEROINES. (By)
Collins, Gail. First Edition. (2003.) HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.
New York: NY. ”

A Reference Text ...
A Reference Text …
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s